Replacing rear derailleur (was Rear derailleur problems)

Discussion in 'General Cycling' started by Mark, Sep 23, 2011.

  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Given I have had little (no) success in getting my rear gears to work
    I think the only thing is to replace all related components: cassette,
    derailleur, chain, cable, and shifter. Some of the components may
    still be OK but I don't want to waste any more time.

    Are there any gotchas like products to avoid? I was thinking of
    purchasing the following:
    - Shimano HG30 7 speed cassette
    - Shimano HG40 7 speed chain
    - Shimano Alivio Rear Mech 7/8sp M410 (or an Acera?)
    - Shimano Altus SL-M310 RapidFire 7 Speed Band-On Lever Pod Right Hand
    - Shimano gear cable and outer

    The bike is an old hybrid but is used every day for commuting. I want
    to spend as little as possible while ensuring that it is reliable.
    Or should I consider swapping brands completely (SRAM?) I don't want
    to mess around too much so moving to 8 speed seems to much hassle.
    --
    (\__/) M.
    (='.'=) Due to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
    (")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking some articles
    posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
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    Mark, Sep 23, 2011
    #1
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  2. The Shimano like-for-like should be fine, no real need to switch to
    Sram other than for religious reasons I'd say.

    I do like the Tacx idlers with proper bearings over the bushed type
    but that's only really a consideration when you get to the point that
    the new idlers are experiencing wear.

    Guy
     
    Just zis Guy, you know?, Sep 23, 2011
    #2
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  3. Mark

    Clive George Guest

    First I'd not use a Shimano chain. I use SRAM, others use other
    non-shimano ones. And for the gear cable/outer, I'd use whatever is
    available so long as the cable is stainless. Don't forget ferrules.

    Second, a thought on the order in which you do things. Chain, cassette,
    cable are all consumables, so if you're planning on riding the bike more
    than a couple of thousand miles, you can't lose by getting these and
    trying them.

    Rear mech is next - except you had something odd with your jockey
    wheels, so maybe include that in your first order.

    Shifter is unlikely to be the problem, so I'd leave that to last.

    Slipping - sure it's at the back, not the front? Hang on - new chain, no
    new cassette? I know you say the cassette is fairly new, and the chain
    is seating on it fine, but they do that. They look like they're going to
    work right up till you pedal on them.
     
    Clive George, Sep 23, 2011
    #3
  4. Mark

    Jim Guest

    x-no-archive: On Sep 23, 11:52 am, Mark

    IME experience Shimano chains snap at low mileages. I'd advise a
    different brand of chain.
     
    Jim, Sep 23, 2011
    #4
  5. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Thanks for the useful info. I wish I could pursuade SWMBO so that I
    could get a new bike but the purse strings are closed ;-)
    I suspect there may be something wrong there too since the adjuster
    will only turn using pliers. Also, just before the last chain broke,
    it was shifting OK between sprokets 3-6 but not on well on 1+2 & 7.
    Not 100% sure but the chainset is even newer than the cassette so I
    made the assumption.
    Strangely it was only slipping some days and not others!
    --
    (\__/) M.
    (='.'=) Due to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
    (")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking some articles
    posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
    everyone you will need use a different method of posting.
     
    Mark, Sep 23, 2011
    #5
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Last one broke after a few days.
    --
    (\__/) M.
    (='.'=) Due to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
    (")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking some articles
    posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
    everyone you will need use a different method of posting.
     
    Mark, Sep 23, 2011
    #6
  7. Mark

    Nigel Cliffe Guest

    I'd go for a slightly better rear mech, possibly as high as "LX". A little
    higher up the Shimano range will still be fine with a 7/8 speed chain but I
    find it gives much better shifting.
    My hack uses a cheap Acera rear mech and basic rapid fire shifter, and its
    been reasonably reliable. The shifting isn't perfect - frequently need to
    slightly over-push the lever then let it relax back. In contrast another
    bike with LX which has precision shift every time.
    Are you sure its a Cassette rear axle, and not a screw-on freewheel ? It
    could be either.
    Screw-on are still available in 7-speed from Shimano.

    - Nigel
     
    Nigel Cliffe, Sep 23, 2011
    #7
  8. Mark

    Simon Mason Guest

    I use KMC and Wipperman chains and find the KMC ones the best.
     
    Simon Mason, Sep 23, 2011
    #8
  9. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Thanks for the info. I'm not always sure what is still compatible with
    7 speed. I've found the original Acera one very good until recently.
    It's definitely a cassette. I have replaced several times already :)

    But I am tempted to get a new bike instead right now so I don't have
    to spend as much time on maintenance.
     
    Mark, Sep 23, 2011
    #9
  10. Mark

    Adam Lea Guest

    If you are going to replace most of the drivetrain have you considered a
    hub gear? More robust and less maintenance.
     
    Adam Lea, Sep 23, 2011
    #10
  11. Mark

    thirty-six Guest


    That points to a gunged up freehub, as doesthe sagging chain when you
    back-pedal. You need to get some oil in there somehow.
     
    thirty-six, Sep 23, 2011
    #11
  12. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Not really. I don't know much about them and I would guess they
    require a lot more modifications (and cost a lot more) to fit?
     
    Mark, Sep 24, 2011
    #12
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