New bike for going to the shops

Discussion in 'Cycling Archive' started by Jim Tomas, Jul 1, 2015.

  1. Jim Tomas

    Jim Tomas Guest

    Can anyone recommend a new bike for me? I have a road bike which I love
    but I'd like something a bit cheaper for riding to the shops, work, etc.

    I'm looking for something that:
    1. Doesn't need too much maintenance
    2. OK being left out in the rain
    3. Allows me to get a bit of speed on the roads without too much effort
    4. Non-aggressive road position. I get a sore neck using my road bike
    (despite lots of adjustments) so looking to be a bit more upright
    5. Can be fitted with mud guards, possibly panniers
    6. Can be used off road occasionally

    My budget is £300-400
     
    Jim Tomas, Jul 1, 2015
    #1
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  2. Jim Tomas

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Your criteria are broadly similar to those I had when I was looking for
    a bike for my daughter a couple of years ago. She ended up with a Giant
    Escape 3W. My wife liked it so much, she ended up with an Escape City W
    for her birthday last year.

    I recommend taking a look at the Escape range:
    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-gb/bikes/series/new.escape/22033/
     
    Danny Colyer, Jul 2, 2015
    #2
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  3. Jim Tomas

    Rob Morley Guest

    "The most accurate way to determine any bike’s weight is to have your
    local dealer weigh it for you. Many brands strive to list the lowest
    possible weight, but in reality weight can vary based on size, finish,
    hardware and accessories. All Giant bikes are designed for
    best-in-class weight and ride quality."

    I like that - I wonder if it persuades anyone not to be a weight weenie.
     
    Rob Morley, Jul 2, 2015
    #3
  4. Jim Tomas

    Jim Tomas Guest

    Thanks, I'll check it out.

    I'm surprised you were able read my message as it doesn't look like my
    usenet provider is treating URCM as a moderated group. Certainly it
    didn't reach Google Groups.
     
    Jim Tomas, Jul 2, 2015
    #4
  5. Jim Tomas

    Sam Wilson Guest

    My son (6'2", longish legs) recently got a 23" Ridgeback Speed. I tried
    it out (it fitted me too, just under 5'10" but with proportionally long
    legs) and it was very nice. The next one up in the range, the Meteor,
    would also have been a contender. Both come with mudguards and rack as
    standard.

    I've just got a 20.5" Marin Fairfax SC3 with added rack and mudguards on
    the cycle to work scheme, but that's outside your budget.

    Sam
     
    Sam Wilson, Jul 3, 2015
    #5
  6. Jim Tomas

    David B Guest

    Personally I'd go for a Moulton, there's a TSR 9 on flee bay at the moment
    for £450.

    Warning - Moultons are addictive!
     
    David B, Jul 3, 2015
    #6
  7. Jim Tomas

    Peter Clinch Guest

    While I agree, my eBay TSR8 was £700 a few years ago, which is perhaps a
    more realistic indication of the final price :-(

    If you wait until the annual change of models you might well find
    something that fits the bill well for quite a lot less than standard
    price. We got our son a £600 Cube hybrid with an 8 speed hub gear for
    under £400 from Chain Reaction for no other reason than it was "last
    year's model". If you want less maintenance then a hub typically needs
    less fettling than derailleurs and usually gives you a greater range
    too. Occasional off-road and a decent turn of speed are quite a bit
    about tyre selection.

    Pete.
     
    Peter Clinch, Jul 3, 2015
    #7
  8. bikesales.org.uk is worth a look for the deals on at any one time on branded
    bikes. Though something like Ridgeback (a brand from the UK importer of
    Shimano, so a vehicle for decent-quslity Shimano bits) are also good value.

    If you don't know what you're doing, probably worth having a look at what
    brands can be found in your local bike shops, since the support should come
    in handy in terms of setting the bike up correctly.

    Theo
     
    Theo Markettos, Jul 4, 2015
    #8
  9. Seems like a poor excuse for not telling you what it actually weighs. No
    reason why the manufacturer can't give the weight for each size, just as
    they give the geometry for each size.
    Obviously it depends on the hardware, but they quote a full
    specification, so why not quote the weight for that.

    If you did ask at a bike shop, would they have any suitable scales?
     
    Craig Wallace, Jul 4, 2015
    #9
  10. My wife has a Giant, and it weighs c. 19 Kg, fully configured (no
    suspension, rim brakes and derailleur).

    Yes, I agree about the lack of information, but manufacturers often
    give the weight, but not enough of the geometry to work out if a
    bicycle is plausible. And, as we have discussed so often, the weight
    is only rarely a major factor compared to the geometry.


    Regards,
    Nick Maclaren.
     
    Nick Maclaren, Jul 4, 2015
    #10
  11. Jim Tomas

    Rob Morley Guest

    Except weight probably varies enough by batch that they'll not want to
    publish the high end because it makes them look uncompetitive, and
    they'll not publish the low end because most of their bikes will be
    heavier than that (so it's "misleading advertising" or whatever).
    Too many variables? The manufacturer probably won't have sufficient
    control over the components he buys, at the price he can afford.
    If they don't I do, and eBay does for under a fiver (look for
    electronic luggage scale). They're not going to be highly accurate,
    but good enough for comparing bike weights I think. But really a
    kilogram here or there doesn't make any practical difference, except
    it might be beneficial - stiffer or stronger components. The most
    important weight is rotating weight (and in the case of suspension
    bikes, maybe sprung weight) but nobody quotes those for built bikes.
    "It's not the bike, it's the rider." :)
     
    Rob Morley, Jul 4, 2015
    #11
  12. and as ever depending on type of bike that can be good or bad though
    rarely as bad as the weight weenes claim.

    My full suspention giant MTB is 30lb/14KG, my cheap CX isn't much
    lighter 27lb/12KG and the old MTB that is my town bike now is 44lb/20KG
    with it's mudgaurds and what not.

    with decent tyres the old MTB is still swift, get suprised roadies as it
    rumbles by.
    indeed type of bike has a fair old effect. weight unless your into
    racing and hill climbs less so.

    Roger Merriman
     
    Roger Merriman, Jul 4, 2015
    #12
  13. Weight is important for momentum; Myself and a colleague (or should that
    be "a colleague and I"?) kept up with some weekend sprinters once whilst
    on holiday; they had lycra and bare cycles, we had full panniers!
     
    Kerr Mudd-John, Jul 5, 2015
    #13
  14. Jim Tomas

    soup Guest

    Is £10 within your budget?

    http://postimg.org/image/pwynssjtd/

    Neighbour donated their son's bike I hand painted it with Hammerite
    oiled the orange mess that was a chain and slapped new cables on it and
    added a pair of bar-ends/mudguards I had lying about.
    Total cost to me ~ £10.
    Cost in heartache if it had been stolen/vandalised ~ zero
    Mind you it pretty much fails in the "bit of speed" and "without too
    much effort" departments.
     
    soup, Jul 5, 2015
    #14
  15. Jim Tomas

    soup Guest

    What you failed to mention was that while you and your colleague are
    'fit as %^$&' the weekend sprinters were only 'playing at it'.
     
    soup, Jul 5, 2015
    #15
  16. Precisely. I was overtaken the other day by a young woman in
    ordinary clothes on a 'utility' bicycle, pedalling fairly gently.
    I was pushing myself on a very efficient roadster at 70% of peak.
    Of course, her peak was probably 2-3 times mine :)


    Regards,
    Nick Maclaren.
     
    Nick Maclaren, Jul 5, 2015
    #16
  17. Jim Tomas

    Jim Tomas Guest

    Jim Tomas, Jul 5, 2015
    #17
  18. Jim Tomas

    soup Guest

    Many moons ago there was a trend in URC to post photos with AtoZs,
    tools, London Pride beer (as that was subtitled 'a pub bike for
    teetotalers' rather thought a bottle of London Pride was
    inappropriate.) and so on (I can't remember all the details).

    As that pic was taken 'years ago' the maps, tools and OXOs probably had
    some significance just what that was is now lost.
     
    soup, Jul 5, 2015
    #18
  19. one of my wifes work colleagues is a young dutch woman, so suit and
    utility bike, watching her waft past MAMIL's and look of horror on their
    faces!


    Roger Merriman
     
    Roger Merriman, Jul 5, 2015
    #19
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