Hub Dynamo charger

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by David Damerell, Apr 9, 2010.

  1. The latest Cycletouring contains a short article about
    www.pedalpower.com.au, who make a device for converting AC dynamo output
    to DC and charging arbitary devices. Anyone got one? Does it work?
     
    David Damerell, Apr 9, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. David Damerell

    Alex Potter Guest

    Alex Potter, Apr 9, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. I've more faith in B&M than some random bunch I've never heard of...

    My main objection to GPS is that it's not human powered. I submitted to
    batteries for backup lighting, mind.
     
    David Damerell, Apr 9, 2010
    #3
  4. David Damerell

    bugbear Guest

    What the hell? The images on that site are
    GIFs - they've either got a barking mad webmaster,
    or the site's really old.

    http://www.pedalpower.com.au/index_files/Page2041.htm

    BugBear
     
    bugbear, Apr 9, 2010
    #4
  5. Alan Braggins, Apr 9, 2010
    #5
  6. David Damerell

    Tosspot Guest

    They want a 150 euros for that! What's it made of, unobtanium? <Checks
    B+M> Blimey, 140 for that one, I'd take the Tout in that case, nice neat
    solution. Heh! I could run my 500Gbyte external disc from it :)
     
    Tosspot, Apr 10, 2010
    #6
  7. David Damerell

    Simon Brooke Guest

    Simon Brooke, Apr 10, 2010
    #7
  8. David Damerell

    Rob Morley Guest

    You can get a rectifier/regulator module for about a tenner (eBay) that
    will probably do almost as good a job[1], although you'd have to wire
    and package it yourself so it probably wouldn't look as neat.


    [1] Assuming that the proprietary systems use particularly high-quality
    high-efficiency components to justify their cost, otherwise the
    standard Chinese version is probably just as good.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 10, 2010
    #8
  9. David Damerell

    Phil W Lee Guest

    The other B&M method is to use a Ride&Charge cable to an Ixon IQ, and
    charge AA NiMh cells.
    There are several GPS units that run on an AA diet, and I'd generally
    describe AA as the universal power source - you can get almost
    ANYTHING in an AA driven design, from GPS through MP3 players to video
    and digicams.
     
    Phil W Lee, Apr 11, 2010
    #9
  10. David Damerell

    Rob Morley Guest

    The USB standard (5V, 500mA to 1800mA depending on source) is getting
    pretty popular for just about everything. Micro-USB is the current
    standard for mobile phone chargers and it makes sense for manufacturers
    of cameras, MP3 players, GPS units etc. to take advantage of the number
    of chargers that this makes available. I agree that AA and AAA cells
    are a useful standard if you want to carry additional capacity without
    worrying about a multitude of proprietary rechargeable batteries, but
    limiting your gadgets to those that will run on standard cells will
    restrict your choice.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 12, 2010
    #10
  11. You could use an AA powered USB charger, allowing use of gadgets with
    a multitude of proprietary internal batteries while carrying a single
    variety of replaceable battery. It's not ideal, but it does give you
    more options.
    http://gizmodo.com/177527/mintyboost-diy-aa-usb-charger
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-4-x-AA-USB-Altoids-Battery/
     
    Alan Braggins, Apr 12, 2010
    #11
  12. David Damerell

    Ben Guest

    My heart sank when I saw the elegant B+M solution- I am in the process of
    soldering up my own box- but then when I saw the price I was relieved. I am
    using the plan in this thread:
    http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=6672.60

    All the parts plus a box and connectors for the hub input comes to around
    £15 with delivery from Maplin. It charges via a USB socket.

    Ben
     
    Ben, Apr 12, 2010
    #12
  13. David Damerell

    Ian Jackson Guest

    This is unfortunately true. But I get really annoyed by ones that
    have weirdo batteries.

    The weirdo batteries wear out and then the gadget becomes useless; if
    you're lucky you can then pay a fortune for a new weirdo battery. The
    builtin or supplied charger is less sophisticated than the expensive
    one you bought for your standard cells, so the weirdo batteries last
    less long anyway; also your expensive AA charger can tell you clearly
    when your batteries are duff and need to be replaced. If you
    accidentally leave one of your gadgets switched on overnight and drain
    the batteries, you can't cannibalise batteries from another gadget in
    the morning. The battery lifetime is almost impossible to measure in
    tests so gadget manufacturers don't optimise for it.

    The only device I have that takes weirdo batteries is my laptop.

    I also have one of those hugely bright torches with an integral
    battery but it wore out in a matter of months of occasional use and is
    now essentially dead. Some day I'll take a hacksaw to it and see if I
    can reuse the torch part.
     
    Ian Jackson, Apr 12, 2010
    #13
  14. David Damerell

    Rob Morley Guest

    On Mon, 12 Apr 2010 09:26:10 +0100
    Indeed, although that might confuse things when it comes to
    rationalizing a scheme for powering devices from a dynamo - do you
    stick to charging AA cells and run everything from power packs, or go
    for USB and charge AA cells with a USB charger, or design a system that
    provides for both?
    The second one is really nasty and could easily cause damage.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 12, 2010
    #14
  15. David Damerell

    Simon Brooke Guest

    That looks extremely interesting! Where was the circuit diagram
    published, and, if it's free of copyright, would it be possible to
    publish a clearer version? Is there anything interesting happening under
    that big black capacitor, or out of frame to the left?
     
    Simon Brooke, Apr 12, 2010
    #15
  16. David Damerell

    Rob Morley Guest

    That's fine if you're doing it for fun, but if you want a pre-tested
    no-soldering solution just get one of these
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260489148955
    and stick it in a box.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 12, 2010
    #16
  17. David Damerell

    Ben Guest

    The circuit diagram is a few pages back in the thread:
    http://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=6672.15

    If you read through the thread they also give the Maplin part numbers, so it
    is very easy to order the right bits.

    Ben
     
    Ben, Apr 12, 2010
    #17
  18. David Damerell

    Tim Hall Guest

    Page 2 of the thread, by Simon Galgut. I'm sure if you ask nicely
    he'll tell you what its copyright status is. If you can't see his
    email, on account of not having a yacf account, I do.
     
    Tim Hall, Apr 12, 2010
    #18
  19. David Damerell

    Rob Morley Guest

    Data sheets for semiconductor components often have example circuits
    for particular applications, and are generally freely downloadable as
    PDFs.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 12, 2010
    #19
  20. I suppose you could get a hand-cranked laptop :)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OLPC_XO-1#Power_consumption

    AA powered emergency phone chargers are common, but I don't think I've
    seen a phone that takes AA batteries.
     
    Alan Braggins, Apr 12, 2010
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.