camera mounting

Discussion in 'Cycling Archive' started by Adam Funk, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. Adam Funk

    Adam Funk Guest

    Having recently talked to someone who uses a Garmin camera mounted on
    his handlebars, I am thinking of investing in a Garmin VIRB Elite or
    similar, but I have a couple of questions.

    Does anyone know if the Garmins work *easily* with Linux? (I know you
    can always take the memory card out & plug that into a computer, but
    if the camera itself works as a mass storage device, that's easier.)

    Will a camera mounted on the front handlebar catch enough of a close
    overtaking incident?

    Thanks.
     
    Adam Funk, Jul 7, 2015
    #1
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  2. Adam Funk

    Mike Causer Guest

    I don't know about Garmin, but with a GoPro it's a lot faster to take
    the card out and plug into computer. Linux is nicely consistent with
    transfer speeds, but Win8 can be frustratingly slow about 1 in 3
    transfers. With my Olympus and Canon cameras I just use the camera as
    mass storage device. However they've got more battery power available
    and more space inside for better components. (Linux Mint 17.1 64bit on
    desktop and laptop.)


    Mike
     
    Mike Causer, Jul 7, 2015
    #2
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  3. Adam Funk

    Ian Jackson Guest

    I think that depends on the field of view. And also on the
    inclinations of the person watching the video. It's difficult to
    judge the sideways separation of the vehicle as it passes.
     
    Ian Jackson, Jul 7, 2015
    #3
  4. Adam Funk

    Rob Morley Guest

    If you just clamp it on the handlebar you'll be lucky to get an image
    that isn't all motion blur from vibration, unless the camera has good
    image stabilisation.
     
    Rob Morley, Jul 7, 2015
    #4
  5. remarkably how much closer and further away camera's show, depending on
    angle of view and where they are mounted.

    Roger Merriman
     
    Roger Merriman, Jul 7, 2015
    #5
  6. Adam Funk

    Adam Funk Guest

    The guy who was praising his Garmin camera said it has that.
     
    Adam Funk, Jul 7, 2015
    #6
  7. Adam Funk

    soup Guest

    Well here is a youtube video of what a camera clamped to the handlebars
    looks and sounds like, because it is solidly fixed to the frame it
    picks up every creak/rattle/squeak produced by the bicycle, it is not
    really that noisy going about. It has no post editing at all to sort
    out the stabilization, (I would view it at 1080p but even then the
    quality is not earth shattering but then the camera is a cheap chinese
    knock-off of a Go-Pro (SJ4000)
     
    soup, Jul 8, 2015
    #7
  8. Adam Funk

    kimble Guest

    Doesn't YouTube do some sort of image stabilisation as part of its
    upload processing?

    *googles* Ah, it's an option - it doesn't happen automatically.

    As you were.


    Kim.
    --
     
    kimble, Jul 9, 2015
    #8
  9. Adam Funk

    colwyn Guest

    colwyn, Jul 9, 2015
    #9
  10. Adam Funk

    soup Guest

    You are quite correct they do offer to remove the "shaking",
    but I deliberately didn't do this to see what an unstabilized image
    looked like, (I have also posted vids with a chest rig, with a head
    rig, clamped to the bars but in stop-action [flicker book] mode etc to
    see which looked best/acceptable.
     
    soup, Jul 9, 2015
    #10
  11. Adam Funk

    Rob Morley Guest

    Done properly a soft mount system will definitely help, but I don't
    think just sticking one of those bonded rubber mounts between the
    camera and frame will do anything useful. Maybe if you had several,
    and some struts ...
     
    Rob Morley, Jul 10, 2015
    #11
  12. Adam Funk

    Adam Funk Guest

    Adam Funk, Jul 13, 2015
    #12
  13. Adam Funk

    Rob Morley Guest

    Very useful things, old inner tubes. I have a few that are only good
    for cutting up, as mice got into my stash of tubes awaiting puncture
    repair, and apparently butyl is tasty.
    As for camera mounts, I think perhaps some lengths of innertube (or
    bungee cord) stretched from the handlebar to the fork crown would
    isolate at least road noise coming through the frame.
     
    Rob Morley, Jul 13, 2015
    #13
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