BBC Breakfast - helmet cams

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by Geoff Berrow, Feb 1, 2011.

  1. Geoff Berrow

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    BBC breakfast showed some footage from helmet cams today.

    I'd be interested to hear comments from cyclists.
     
    Geoff Berrow, Feb 1, 2011
    #1
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  2. Geoff Berrow

    Simon Mason Guest

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12330181

    Seems pretty normal to me. The incident with the van is quite common on
    certain roads I used to use, especially one with a left hand 120 degree bend
    when vans would come alongside then cut in. I simply avoid such roads now as
    far as is possible. I will definitely be fitting fixed cameras front and
    rear soon.

    As for the van drivers, I think some are maybe struggling financially and
    see the cyclist "blocking" their path as part of the greater conspiracy to
    make their lives hell and so they will use their bulk as a weapon to fight
    back.
     
    Simon Mason, Feb 1, 2011
    #2
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  3. Geoff Berrow

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    On the other hand van drivers do suffer from limited visibility. If
    it were me, having been cut up once I think I'd have backed off,
    discretion being the better part of valour.

    In the car incident the reporter says "you can sense what is about to
    happen". I've been cut up by cars many times as a motorcyclist and so
    sensed the same thing. No question that the driver was at fault but
    it behooves us all to try to prevent accidents.
     
    Geoff Berrow, Feb 1, 2011
    #3
  4. Yeah but the problem is that the adrenaline is flowing at that point.
    The whole fight or flight response is trying to kick in.
     
    Andy Leighton, Feb 1, 2011
    #4
  5. Geoff Berrow

    Tom Crispin Guest

    Three years ago I was leading a group of twelve 8/9 year old children
    on a ride at the end of their Bikeability cyclist training. We were
    riding along a road on the Isle of Dogs in East London approaching a
    dock crossing. There is no space for a motorist to overtake cyclists
    on the lifting dock bridge, so to keep the children safe the rear
    cyclist - also an adult - and I, took a position in the centre of the
    lane.

    As we crossed the bridge a motorist overtook the entire group, and
    came head to head with a truck coming the other way. Fortunately a
    crash was avoided. However, the motorist then swerved into me forcing
    me against the kerb and railings. He got out of his motor vehicle and
    thumped me, before getting back into his vehicle and driving off.

    I made a complaint to Limehouse Police Station. I had twelve child
    witnesses, and three other drivers. I had also manged to photograph
    his car, and British Waterways had video evidence.

    For fifteen months I had monthly letters from the police saying that
    they were investigating. After fifteen months I had a letter stating
    that there was insufficient evidence to continue with the
    investigation.

    How I wish I had a helmet camera - though were I would put it I know
    not as I do not wear a helmet!

    http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?layer=c&panoid=sM-ILoy5vP3CRppEwR81dQ&cbp=12,186.35,,0,11.72
    http://www.britishschoolofcycling.com/photos/thug.jpg
     
    Tom Crispin, Feb 1, 2011
    #5
  6. Geoff Berrow

    Simon Mason Guest

    To be discussed tonight on BBC Radio 5 Live at 2230.
     
    Simon Mason, Feb 1, 2011
    #6
  7. Geoff Berrow

    Tony Raven Guest

    Expect a whole load of red in the face lycraphobia in traditional R5Live
    style.

    Tony
     
    Tony Raven, Feb 1, 2011
    #7
  8. Geoff Berrow

    D.M. Procida Guest

    I read the article, but didn't see the piece.

    I'd believe just about any story of motorists' stupidity or malice in
    which a cyclist is the innocent victim, having been on the end of it
    myself.

    Maybe these cameras have helped these people. I don't know.

    I wouldn't use one. I prefer to rely on my own wits and judgement to
    make me safe on the bike. I know that if I were armed with a gun or a
    camera I'd find myself more often in situations where I'd use it, and I
    don't want that to happen.

    I don't like the feeling of going out armed for confrontation. I can get
    that at home from my children.

    Daniele
     
    D.M. Procida, Feb 1, 2011
    #8
  9. Geoff Berrow

    Simon Mason Guest

    I don't see it as being "armed" as such. Cameras are only passive
    devices that give you a bit of insurance in what otherwise is a very
    one sided situation with a motorist having the "muscle". If aggressive
    motorists learn that they might be being filmed, it may make them
    think twice before attempting something stupid.
     
    Simon Mason, Feb 1, 2011
    #9
  10. Geoff Berrow

    Martin Guest

    About 4 years ago I strapped a camera to my handle bars, but stopped
    using it 2 years ago. I noticed several things.

    Firstly it improved my cycling, the thought of recording my journey
    meant that I did fewer silly things in case I needed to use the video as
    evidence. Also when I had near misses, I often played back what happened
    after I got home, and occasionally realised I had done something silly.
    That also improved my cycling safety.

    The problem with having one mounted on my handle bars was that it often
    missed things, the resolution was rubbish and it was 50/50 whether a
    number plate was readable. It was remarkably rubbish at showing just how
    close many passes were.

    Saying that I recorded a couple of motorists threatening to kill me,
    several attempts to drive me off the road, a couple of assaults, and
    numerous other things.
     
    Martin, Feb 1, 2011
    #10
  11. Geoff Berrow

    Tom Crispin Guest

    While I would not like to suggest it is the case in the footage shown
    on the BBC news, there is always a danger that a tiny minority of
    cyclists might cycle in a manner which would deliberately provoke
    dangerous and aggressive driving. I would hope that a competent police
    officer might be able to spot such cycling and dismiss any attempt at
    entrapment by such a cyclist presenting video footage. But there is
    always a danger that such an action by a cyclist could waste a great
    deal of police and court time.

    Overall, and given the experiences I have suffered, I think that the
    advantages of such a system outweigh the disadvantages.
     
    Tom Crispin, Feb 1, 2011
    #11
  12. Geoff Berrow

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    That's what I was wondering. It seemed to me in the examples shown
    that in a couple of cases that the cyclist was not entirely without
    blame.
    I thought cycling wasn't dangerous? ;-)
     
    Geoff Berrow, Feb 2, 2011
    #12
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